The Fall Before Paradise Release Date: 2004 Genre: Thriller Director(s): Steven Gillian Writer(s): Steven Gillian Staring: Jennifer Chudy, Greg Cool and Kimberly S. Fairbanks Here’s a good question for The Fall Before Paradise’s director, writer, and producer Steven Gillian. How did York Entertainment wind up releasing your movie, which probably could’ve gotten distribution through Ardustry […]

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The Fall Before Paradise
Release Date: 2004
Genre: Thriller
Director(s): Steven Gillian
Writer(s): Steven Gillian
Staring: Jennifer Chudy, Greg Cool and Kimberly S. Fairbanks

Here’s a good question for The Fall Before Paradise’s director, writer, and producer Steven Gillian. How did York Entertainment wind up releasing your movie, which probably could’ve gotten distribution through Ardustry or Hart Sharp?

The Fall Before Paradise is probably the most professional looking film York Entertainment has distributed since Descendant. That was almost two years ago. That even includes York’s in-house productions Alien 51, Scarecrow Gone Wild, etc. And as much as I love York, they have no business holding the world rights to such a well-done movie. Despite lacking any name talent, The Fall Before Paradise is still something that I can’t believe didn’t get picked up by a more reputable worldwide distributor.

It’s another psychological thriller set in a mental ward, but this one’s got a unique story to it that’s incredibly interesting to watch unfold. After an opening scene that sees a young boy pull a gun on the man who frequently molests his sister, and receiving a few pistol whips to the face as his reward, we quickly cut to mental patient Max. At first we’re unaware of whether or not this is actually the grown-up version of that young child, but the truth is revealed soon after. Every night he wakes up covered in sweat thanks to dreams of those two children. Through the nightmares he’s able to tie together the facts and figure out the children’s origin. A childless, low-class couple abducted the two, leaving a distraught mother trying to cope with her loss. While the boy is now dead from the head blows and buried in the woods, Max knows that the little girl is still alive, and resolves to do everything to help her despite the doubts coming from those around him.

Max’s only link to the outside world is Maddie, an attractive young woman whose mind is so forgone that she believes the telephone company is controlling the minds of everyone but Max and herself. While her scenes do fill the obligatory “crazy person rambles” quota of a film of this kind, they go on a little too long at times. When the twist is revealed at the end, her participation makes sense though.

The Fall Before Paradise doesn’t break any new ground, but when you consider the trash York has become known to put on the market, it’s a welcome change of pace. I only hope York puts in an effort to sell his film internationally as much as they do their in-house films, as I’d really like to see another movie from Gillian.

DVD: Barebones, complete with the beautiful, cost-cutting, York Entertainment menu screen.

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