Final Voyage Release Date: 7 October 1999 (Malaysia) Genre: Action | Drama Director(s): Jay Andrews (aka Jim Wynorski) Writer(s): Andrew Stevens (Intrepid) & James Morley III (Intrepid) Starring: Ice-T, Erika Eleniak, Dylan Walsh, Claudia Christian More classic Jim Wynorski (as Jay Andrews, of course) schlock here, as he tackles the aspect of terrorists taking over […]

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Final Voyage
Release Date: 7 October 1999 (Malaysia)
Genre: Action | Drama
Director(s): Jay Andrews (aka Jim Wynorski)
Writer(s): Andrew Stevens (Intrepid) & James Morley III (Intrepid)
Starring: Ice-T, Erika Eleniak, Dylan Walsh, Claudia Christian

More classic Jim Wynorski (as Jay Andrews, of course) schlock here, as he tackles the aspect of terrorists taking over a cruise ship. In other words, it’s easily identified as yet another in a long run of legendary direct-to-video films that put Die Hard in/on a [___________]. Just like Rangers, this is yet another one of Wynorski’s films that fully takes advantage of the benefits that stock footage brings. But unlike Rangers, which was just plain boring with Wynorski and (writer) Steve Latshaw taking too many liberties with stock footage, Final Voyage doesn’t sink.

Yes, I did come up with that pun on my own. And yes, I am very proud of myself if you don’t mind me saying.

Final Voyage opens up with, as Wynorski puts it, “something for the sport fans.” A rough and tuff bodyguard by the name of Aaron is on a plane protecting an aging Hollywood actress. Just another day in office you ask? Nope, as the Hollywood hand comes into play, resulting in a group of terrorists commandeering the flight. It’s not long before he sends two of them out the plane in a hilariously fake fashion, at the same time frightening the actress beyond repair. The scene is cheesy and rushed beyond belief, but it’s still fun.

Heroism is not high on Aaron agency’s priorities, so he is reassigned to guard the trustfund brat, played by “Baywatch’s” Erika Eleniak, during a very prestigious cruise. Aboard the ship, enclosed in a vault, is millions of dollars in treasure. And here’s where the (new) terrorists come into play. Led by Ice-T and the sexyevil Max (Claudia Christian), they quickly bring the party down. Of the few to avoid the scorn of the terrorists are the rough ‘n’ tuff bodyguard, the snob, and one of the boat workers, played by the old, recognizable comic Rick Docummun.

From there, it’s the oh-so-standard, but actually really fun, formula of having the good guys face off against the psychopaths, who are without consciences, in a battle for control of the boat. Ice-T delivers as the lead terrorist who doesn’t seem all that fluid with his lines (shockingly enough), while Claudia Christian just oozes charisma. Aside them are the usual bunch of generic terrorists, the majority of which are regulars in features by Fred Olen Ray and Wynorski.

Recommended, if only because it’s one of Wynorski’s best additions to the genre of stock footage action films. It’s multitudes more entertaining than Rangers and Desert Thunder, with enough general gunplay, cute dialogue, and Ice-T shooting white people to be worth the time investment.

DVD: God bless the viral Jim Wynorski. He may only be in the business to make money and get laid, but he loves self-deprecation. Him and Claudia Christian came in for a tremendous commentary, one that is his best so far. Christian especially just rips on everything presented in the film. Upon Ice-T’s first appearance, she candidly states, “The lovely and talented Ice-T… Takes fifty takes to say the word ‘Yes.’” Accompanying the commentary is the usual fluff.

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