Devon’s Ghost: Legend of the Bloody Boy Release Date: 10 May 2005 (USA) Genre: Horror | Action Director(s): Johnny Yong Bosch & Koichi Sakamoto (Extreme Heist) Writer(s): Karan Ashley, Ron Day, & Tim Grace Starring: Karan Ashley, Johnny Yong Bosch, Reza Bahador So one day the second Yellow and Black Power Rangers decided to make […]

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Devon’s Ghost: Legend of the Bloody Boy
Release Date: 10 May 2005 (USA)
Genre: Horror | Action
Director(s): Johnny Yong Bosch & Koichi Sakamoto (Extreme Heist)
Writer(s): Karan Ashley, Ron Day, & Tim Grace
Starring: Karan Ashley, Johnny Yong Bosch, Reza Bahador

So one day the second Yellow and Black Power Rangers decided to make a movie, and Devon’s Ghost: Legend of the Bloody Boy is the end result.

Not that it really matters, but we learn throughout Devon’s Ghost that a young boy named Devon was murdered years ago by an unloving couple who knocked him in the head with a baseball bat. While it’s never exactly explained, I believe they buried him in the backyard, where a family member retrieved him before he had actually died. The parents were eventually brought to trial for murder, despite the lack of an actual body, and Devon soon enough murdered the parents and others after they were acquitted.

It was during those murderous escapades that a group of now-high school students saw the boy covered in blood. It has haunted the dreams of Symphony (Ashley) ever since, and her friends to a much lesser extent. For whatever reason, Devon decides that it’s time to leave the attic, with his baseball bat now having a handy saw blade attached to it. Soon enough couples are dying all over the place, apparently because Devon associates any male and female together as being representative of his parents. As things go in slasher films, those who saw him years before eventually start being hunted as well.

Going in, I knew this wasn’t going to be a cinematic masterpiece. After all, I once again point out that two stars of the movie were Power Rangers, and co-director Sakamoto directed many episodes of the show. And to say that Sakamoto’s directing talents are far below those of fellow “Power Rangers” director Isaac Florentine (who did the excellent U.S. Seals 2 and American Heroes: Special Forces) would be saying too little. Knowing from the very beginning that I wasn’t going to be witnessing anything resembling art helped me enjoy Devon’s Ghost for flawed slasher flick that it is.

Due to the “Power Rangers” connection I’m willing to forgive the most poorly contrived situations in the film. These are the ones involving karate. Anthony Hickox did this in Blast, but it was at the very least to a lesser extent. In Devon’s Ghost, many of the characters are masters at martial arts, which doesn’t fit into the story at all. Hell, set a scene at a karate studio, which at least puts the idea into the audience’s head that it’s the main characters’ hobby.

I always hate to single out actors for their poor performances, but it must be done in this case. Kristy Vaughan, who played blonde cheerleader Genesis, is out-classed by a pair of Power Rangers. Vaughan rarely delivers lines with much fluency, as she’s all over the spectrum here.

And do I really need to bring up the scene where our metal baseball bat-wielding antagonist chooses to stand in front of a locked truck (which contains heroine Symphony) instead of, you know, using the bat? Please people, work within your budget in the future. If you know going in that you don’t have the budget to smash a window, set the God damn scene somewhere else.

Devon’s Ghost is fun to watch as a b-movie and nothing more. For future reference, those in the market for something competent should never touch a horror movie distributed by MTI without the Redrum logo stamped on it without consulting some reviews first. And if the Redrum logo is there, for crying out loud, get that sucker, as I almost guarantee that it will at least be somewhat great.

DVD: An informative and fun commentary track with the three writers/producers probably influenced me to like the movie a bit more than I had upon first viewing. Despite the crew obviously not being horror fans, instead making Devon’s Ghost because the market was hot, they all appear to have had fun making it. Then there’s a behind-the-scenes featurette that’s more Karan Ashley talking to the camera for five minutes than anything else, a few minutes of outtakes, and some really bad stills that suggests the producers didn’t feel a still photographer was needed.

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