Dead Men Walking Release Date: 25 October 2005 (USA) Genre: Horror Director(s): Peter Mervis Writer(s): Mike Watts Staring: Bay Bruner, Griff Furst, Chriss Anglin During the first half hour or so of Dead Men Walking, I was prepared to deem it cinematic gold. I was digging everything that director Peter Mervis was throwing my way. […]

Autor:

I like watching movies and I like to share its

Dead Men Walking
Release Date: 25 October 2005 (USA)
Genre: Horror
Director(s): Peter Mervis
Writer(s): Mike Watts
Staring: Bay Bruner, Griff Furst, Chriss Anglin

During the first half hour or so of Dead Men Walking, I was prepared to deem it cinematic gold. I was digging everything that director Peter Mervis was throwing my way. Eventually, though, the film just burnt me out.

The plot is so damn good that it should’ve turned out a hell of a lot better than this. Zombies (as a result of a plague that transmit through touch, saliva, blood, etc.) in prison! How does one screw that up? The one-line version of the film is so good that it was sold to The Asylum by writer Mike Watts before one line of the script was even on paper.

Dead Men Walking fails thanks to a combination of three factors. First off, the gore. I love gore in horror movies, but Walking takes it over the top. When someone puts a gun in their mouth and blows their brains out, any other director would cut away to something else. Not in Dead Men Walking. Director Peter Mervis shows it in vivid detail, which kills any impact the scene could have. Going along with this is the absolute cheapness of The Asylum. Shooting the movie in eight days, much of it feels rushed, and with that comes the complete lack of squibs. It’s never really established that you shoot the infected peoples in the head to stop them. For no apparent reason, everyone just knows it. The real reason for this is that squibs cost money, and The Asylum is too damn cheap to use them. I really wish they had scrounged money together to hire someone for even a few squib effects. But I guess exploding heads are cheaper, and going along with The Asylum way, that’s what we get.

The film lacks continuity at every turn. Not only does the eight-day shooting schedule cause awkwardly edited sequences where it’s obvious that actors are entering and leaving rooms in different locations, but the aspects of the plague are constantly going all over the place. Dead Men Walking spends so much time building up the fact that it takes different amounts of time for people to become fully infected. What do they do twenty minutes later? A group of inmates turn into zombies all at virtually the same time. This trend continues throughout the rest of the film.

One scene that really made me want to strangle director Peter Mervis features the warden’s son entering a room where at least two brutally murdered zombies are laying. No one makes any attempt to divert the kid’s eyes from the scene, nor does the actor playing the kid seem to know that he’s supposed to be reacting to the sight of two bodies.

And really, why did they pick this movie to not feature the Asylum regulars? I’m not saying Bay Bruner (as the CDC investigator trying to contain the plague) and Brick Firestone (the plucky inmate) are bad actors, but Kim Little and Rhett Giles would’ve rocked these parts out with ease.

This is the first film that the Asylum has shot on digital video. This seemingly saved them a boatload of money, but it doesn’t look like they pumped it back into the production. As I said before, Dead Men Walking had an eight-day shooting schedule and no squibs. Thanks to the shooting schedule, it looks like they abandoned all attempts at cinematography, unless you count putting a light green filter over the camera lenses as cinematography. If you do, well then someone deserves an award of sorts.

I just spent this whole review criticizing the film, but it’s really not as bad as I’ve made it out to be. It’s got a fun first act, delivers on the gore front, and moves at a fast pace. Ultimately Dead Men Walking fails because the second and third acts move into idiocy, go for gore-over-substance, and eventually go way too fast for its own good.

I never thought I’d say this, but I’m officially sick of zombie movies.
DVD: A commentary with a few people from the production and a behind the scenes featurette that’s pretty good.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 4.0/10 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
Dead Men Walking, 4.0 out of 10 based on 1 rating

Comments on this entry (no comments)

Did you like this post? You can share your opinion with us! Simply click here.

Add Your Comment